Europe

Exploring the Black Perigord: Montignac, Lascaux and Saint-Léon-Sur-Vézère

Pin
Send
Share
Send


The weather forecasts once again projected the forecast and that day the rain accompanied us during most of the day. That's why we decided to dedicate a part of the day to visit the cave of Lascaux. Lascaux cave is decorated by one of the best prehistoric paintings discovered to date. However, currently the original cave cannot be visited, because the excess of visitors began to spoil it. What can be visited is the replica they made a few meters from the original.

The purchase of tickets to the cave has to be done in the nearby town of Montignac, since Lascaux itself is not sold. Montignac is located about thirty minutes from Sarlat and is divided by the Vézère river. Upon arrival, we left the car and went to find somewhere to have breakfast. We found a bar that had a snack menu plus drink for € 5.50. I asked for a croque-monsieur, which is how in France the bikini or mixed sandwich is known. The difference from ours to theirs is that the cheese inside had a texture as if it were cheese béchamel sauce. After breakfast we went to look for the Lascaux tickets that are sold in an office adjacent to the tourist office and after getting them we went to the cave.

Lascaux cave It was discovered in 1940 by four teenagers who were looking for their lost dog. When they entered they were amazed by the paintings of oxen, horses and other animals they found painted on their walls. The paintings are between 15,000 and 17,000 years old. What is currently visited is Lascaux II, cave that was thoroughly recreated by an artist following the techniques of the time and using the same pigments. The reproduction took six years to finish and was inaugurated in 1983. Although the entire original cave was not reproduced, the reproduced part is the one that accumulates the greatest number of paintings. During the tour they explained how it was discovered and what materials and techniques the prehistoric man used to make them. Really very interesting and shocking.

Upon leaving the cave we headed to the town of Saint-Léon-sur-Vézère, which is a small town located in a meander of the Vézère river. The town has a couple of castles (which are closed to the public) and an 11th-century Romanesque church. The problem was that when we got there it was raining so much that the visit was not pleasant. So after a brief walk, we decided to go back to the car and address the hotel.

Pin
Send
Share
Send